ENGLISH TODAY

A blog about the English language, English learning tips, life and events in London and Link School.
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Everyone is welcome, not only our students.

Events and Learning English through Socialising.

20 Tips to Improve Conversational Skills

Posted on in English Courses at Link School, English language tips, Improve English speaking, Learn English Advice, Real English practice Leave a comment

20 Tips to Improve Conversational Skills

Learn English Communication Skills

Improving Conversational Skills is an ongoing process. Interacting with others is an art itself, and a complex one at that.

Here are 20 tips from Link School of English to help you in the process…


    1. Ask quality questions:  Avoid ‘yes’ or ‘no’ evoking responses by asking questions that require detail; these will typically start with one of the five ‘Ws’.
    2. Actively listen: Don’t be thinking of a response while the other is still speaking. Wait 5 to 10 seconds before responding.
    3. Take turns: Balance talking and listening. Monitor yourself to make sure you’re not dominating the conversation.

    Read more


    What is the IELTS Exam?

    Posted on in About IELTS exams, English exams preparation, Learn English Advice, Link School of English 2 Comments

    What is the IELTS Exam?

    The meaning of ‘IELTS’ explained and exam taking tips

    If you are thinking about taking an English exam and not sure which to choose you may be asking what is the IELTS exam.
    The International English Language Testing System (IELTS), is the most popular English proficiency test in the world. It is designed to assess your language ability to determine if you can adequately study or work where English is the primary language.

    A female student writing in a notebook preparing for the Academic IELTS test

    Since 1989, IELTS has proven to be a secure and valid test recognised by universities and employers in over 130 countries, including:  the UK, USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It is also recognised by immigration authorities, professional bodies and other government agencies.

    Check also:

    IELTS Essay Correction Service

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    Is an Evening English Class right for you?

    Posted on in English Courses at Link School, Learn English Advice, Link School of English 1 Comment

    Is an Evening English Class right for you?

    If you’re looking to work and study English at the same time, an evening English course may just be ideal for you.

    Here we look at some of the advantages of our evening classes to help you decide if this is right for you.

    Firstly, as availability of jobs globally (and especially in countries like Greece and Spain) continues to reduce, many students who come to Link School find the need to work and study at the same time in order to be able to fulfil the cost of not just improving their English language skills but also of supporting themselves during their stay in London.

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    8 ways to improve the way you speak English

    Posted on in English language tips, Improve English speaking, Learn English Advice 5 Comments

    How to improve the way you speak English?

    If you want to improve your English speaking skills or learn a more “natural” English accent, there are many things you can do to make this happen.

    Here we discuss 8 tools and techniques you can use that could help improve your skills in this area.

    1) Watch and learn from mouth movements

    An easy way to improve your spoken English skills is to…
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    Common mistakes in English: stationary vs stationery

    Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Learn English Advice 3 Comments

    Common mistakes in English: stationary vs stationery

    Are they two different words or is it just a spelling mistake?

    Stationary vs stationery



    These two words are often confused. Stationary is an adjective. Means standing still, not moving.
    Stationery is a noun. Means writing materials, as pen, paper, envelope, ink, ruler.

    Words origin

    Word origin: from Latin ‘stationem’ (station). ‘Stationarius’ in Medieval Latin was a stationary seller. (Peddlers were more common in the Middle Ages). ‘Stationers’, sellers with a fixed location, were often bookshops. From the 18th century ‘stationery’ was used for articles sold by a stationer, seller of books and paper.

    Do you know if the pronunciation of these words is the same of different? Write in your comment below if you know the answer.

    Read more about common mistekes in English and how to get it right:

    – Common Mistakes in English: Adapt vs Adopt

    – Common Mistakes in English: Connect to or With

    – False Friends in English

    – Our Weekend English Courses

    Learn English: connect to or with

    Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Improve English grammar, Learn English Advice Leave a comment

    What is correct: connect to or with?



    Connect to or connect with



    Actually both may be correct depending on the context. Each of them collocates with different words.


    ‘Connected to’ usually means a physical connection. E.g. ‘Your computer is connected to a printer’.

    ‘Connected with’ someone or something means a relationship. E.g. ‘He is still connected with his school colleagues’, ‘symptoms connected with kidney stones’.



    Read about the English language:

    – What is correct: anyone or anybody
    – Stationary vs Stationery

    – What is correct: Does anybody or Do anybody

    – Our Evening English Courses



    Learn English: ‘does anybody’ or ‘do anybody’?

    Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Learn English Advice 9 Comments

    This is a question very often asked by our students: Does anybody or do anybody?



    Does or do anybody, which is correct?


    Answer: DOES is correct.

    Does anybody vs Do anybody

    Do you know why ‘Does anybody’ is correct?


    ‘Anybody’ is a third person singular form and takes -s in the present simple tense. That’s why the question form requires -s and ‘Does anybody’ is correct.
    The same would apply to ‘Does anyone’, ‘Does anything’ etc. Here are some examples:

  1. Does anyone have a pen I could borrow?
  2. Does anybody know someone who speaks Croatian?


  3. Find out about the difference between anyone and anybody.


    More articles relates to learning English and common mistakes in English:
    – Common mistakes in English: adapt vs adopt
    – How to Learn English with Films
    – Our FCE Exam Preparation Courses


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