ENGLISH TODAY

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False Friends in English

Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Improve English vocabulary

Common False Friends in English – for French Speakers

Attention French speakers – beware of false friends in the English Language

It’s easy to confuse similar words, especially when learning a new language. Here are some examples of ‘False Friends’ in English and French, but we have them in other languages too.

What is a False Friend in a foreign language?

There are many common English words which appear to be the same in French, but which have an entirely different meaning. Lots of French and English words are indeed the same, as they often have the same origin, but there are some words which look or sound identical and are in fact ‘False Friends’ or ‘False Cognates’ as they are known in linguistic circles. So be sensible and make a habit of checking if the words which you happily recycle into English, really convey the meaning that you expect.

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Common mistakes in English: stationary vs stationery

Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Learn English Advice

Common mistakes in English: stationary vs stationery

Are they two different words or is it just a spelling mistake?

These two words are often confused. Stationary is an adjective. Means standing still, not moving.
Stationery is a noun. Means writing materials, as pen, paper, envelope, ink, ruler.

Words origin

Word origin: from Latin ‘stationem’ (station). ‘Stationarius’ in Medieval Latin was a stationary seller. (Peddlers were more common in the Middle Ages). ‘Stationers’, sellers with a fixed location, were often bookshops. From the 18th century ‘stationery’ was used for articles sold by a stationer, seller of books and paper.

Do you know if the pronunciation of these words is the same of different? Write in your comment below if you know the answer.

Read more about common mistekes in English and how to get it right:

– Common Mistakes in English: Adapt vs Adopt

– Common Mistakes in English: Connect to or With

– False Friends in English

– Our Weekend English Courses

Learn English: connect to or with

Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Improve English grammar, Learn English Advice

What is correct: connect to or with?



Actually both may be correct depending on the context. Each of them collocates with different words.


‘Connected to’ usually means a physical connection. E.g. ‘Your computer is connected to a printer’.

‘Connected with’ someone or something means a relationship. E.g. ‘He is still connected with his school colleagues’, ‘symptoms connected with kidney stones’.

Read about:

– What is correct: anyone or anybody
– Stationary vs Stationery

– What is correct: Does anybody or Do anybody

– Our Evening English Courses



Common mistakes in English: adapt vs adopt

Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Improve English grammar, Learn English Advice

Common Mistakes in English: Adapt vs Adopt

There are some very common mistakes in English that even native English speakers make.

‘Adapt’ means to change something and make it suitable for a specific use or situation. ‘Adopt’ means to make something one’s own.

Examples of adapt and adopt:

The key to success is often the ability to adapt.

Martin and Anna adopted two orphans.


More common mistakes in English:
– Stationery or Stationary?

Read more about:
– Does anybody or Do anybody?
– 4 Tips to Improve Your Grammar
– Our English Conversation Classes


Learn English: anyone vs anybody

Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Improve English grammar, Learn English Advice

Anyone vs Anybody

What is the difference between anyone and anybody?

Which one should I use, ‘anyone’ or ‘anybody’?

Have you ever wondered which form is better to use? Here we have some help for you.

The answer is: both are correct and both mean the same. However ‘anybody’ is less formal and ‘anyone’ will suit more formal expressions. You will want to use ‘anyone’ in formal English or in writing whereas ‘anybody’ will sound natural in everyday informal English.

Read more about:

– Does anybody or Do anybody?

– How to Learn English outside of the School

– Intensive English Courses in London

Learn English: ‘does anybody’ or ‘do anybody’?

Posted on in Common mistakes in English, English language tips, Learn English Advice

This is a question very often asked by our students: Does anybody or do anybody?



Answer: DOES is correct.

Does anybody vs Do anybody

Do you know why ‘Does anybody’ is correct?


‘Anybody’ is a third person singular form and takes -s in the present simple tense. That’s why the question form requires -s and ‘Does anybody’ is correct.
The same would apply to ‘Does anyone’, ‘Does anything’ etc.

Find out about the difference between anyone and anybody.

More articles relates to learning English and common mistakes in English:
– Common mistakes in English: adapt vs adopt
– How to Learn English with Films
– Our FCE Exam Preparation Courses